Introduction to Absinthe

Made from the extracts of herbs, absinthe is known for its unique flavor derived from wormwood. It is said to have a high alcohol content ranging from 50 to 75% by volume.

If you are not careful, you may find it has mind altering effects. This is largely due to the liquor containing some of the essential oils from a chemical known as Thujone. This chemical is toxic when consumed in large amounts.

The credit for one of the most infamous beverages known today goes to Dr. Pierre Ordinaire, who crafted a mixture of herbs using Artemisia absinthium (wormwood) to make an emerald looking elixir that was sure to cure anything from anemia to flatulence.

What was meant to remain as a medicine soon turned into a well-known alcoholic drink, thanks to Henri Louis Pernod, who opened the first absinthe distillery in Switzerland.
With massive wine shortages in the second half of the 19th century in France, absinthe became the most fashionable drink. It soon became known as “the Green Fairy” during happy hour that started around five in the afternoon.

It is interesting to know this drink later referred to as “the Green Lady” was said to fuel creativity due to the clarity of mind that you experience from drinking it.

Interesting Facts About Absinthe

This very interesting drink only contain trace amounts of thujone and is described as having a licorice type of flavor with a bitter after taste coming from the wormwood. It also contains herbs such as anise, coriander, hyssop, fennel, lemon balm and veronica.

There is certainly no need to worry about the modern version as it is made from non toxic ingredients that are harmless.

Interestingly when you make your drink using the slotted absinthe spoon with a cube of sugar, the liquor turns into a milky greenish white. This process, known as louching is done to dilute the alcohol and bring the flavor of the natural oils and herbs out that were used to make it.

There was a misconception over the amount of thujone present in this drink, which led to it being banned in most of Europe and the US. The ban had been lifted in 2007, and absinthe is now being revived as an alcoholic drink in the States.

It can truly be said that Absinthe has made its mark throughout history as a famous alcoholic drink to be reckoned with.

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Angeliqu
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Emile Pernot
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La Fée NV
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Mari Mayans
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Pernod Absinth
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